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"Ross's work helped resolve some of my biggest questions of faith."
-Paul W., Wichita, Kansas

Ross.Boone@RawSpoon.com  |  (303) 359-4232

"Shooting Grows Love from Bullet Holes"

"Shooting Grows Love from Bullet Holes"

Dayton. El Paso. Aurora. Charleston. Columbine. So many more.

In the first few centuries when plagues broke out and people were fleeing cities, Christians headed into the cities, toward the carnage to rescue the dying. 
When ancient Rome threw their unwanted babies out to die, the Christians rescued them.

Archibishop Desmond Tutu stopped the bloodbath of revenge by leading South Africa in mass forgiveness after one tribe massacred another.

It takes something different. 
And I know many people feel a lot of anger, shock, fear, sadness, and horror. And justifiably so. It’s a very dark and heavy blanket on us. This is an epidemic, like the plague. So how do we respond?

This piece of art is NOT a statement about gun rights or politics. 
It’s about something different. 


This art piece is about mass shootings in general and the Christian command to rise above our instincts of hate, fear, and revenge. We must mourn fully and justice must be rightly fought for, but may it be motivated by something different than revenge. It takes something different to break these cycles.

What can I do? May I first talk and act kindly to crack the ice suffocating souls who seem to be angry at the world. 
But may I also seek ways to grow sprouts of love where bullet holes have pierced a land. By bringing my caring hands and words to them. By my presence. By vulnerably empathizing from my own losses. By not being afraid of their great pain.

This art was inspired by pastor Patrick Faulhaber who preached this weekend about faith, which gives hope, which motivates us to do things that are different than this world would do. He told that the purple bloom of a Crocus can sometimes be seen popping up while snow is still on the ground. It is a symbol of hope in a time that still seems heavy with cold and darkness.

May this epidemic of mass shootings be cracked by our unlikely blooms of hope pushing through this dark, heavy blanket of cold.